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                <div class="container-fluid">
        <img class="img-responsive header" src="http://hd4wallpapers.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/The-Legend-Of-Zelda-Ocarina-Of-Time-Wallpaper-Hd.jpg" alt="Link: main protagonist of The Legend of Zelda series">
        <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda"><h1 class="text-primary">The Legend of Zelda</h1></a>
        <p>The Legend of Zelda is an action-adventure video game series and has a total of 18 games developed for
            Nintendo's game consoles. The series is one of Nintendo's most prominent franchises.
        <p><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Link_(The_Legend_of_Zelda)">Link</a> is the main character from The Legend of Zelda and is
            often tasked of saving the kingdom of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universe_of_The_Legend_of_Zelda#Hyrule">Hyrule</a> and its princess, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_Zelda">Zelda</a>.</p>
        <h2>History</h2>
        <p>The Legend of Zelda games are not released in chronological order, which leads to a lot of debate among fans.
            On December 21, 2011, Nintendo put an end to this when they released the book,
            <a href="http://www.hyrulehistoria.com/">Hyrule Historia</a>, which contains what is now considered as the
            official timeline.</p>
        <p>This list doesn't follow the official timeline of the games. Instead, the games are listed in order of release date.</p>

        <!-- TIMELINE -->

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda_(video_game)"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/3a/Legend_of_Zelda_NES.PNG"
                                alt="Link attacking Octorok monsters with his sword in the overworld"></a>
                </p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda_(video_game)">
                    <span class="game-title">The Legend of Zelda</span></a>, the first game of the series, was first
                    released in Japan on February 21, 1986, on the Famicom Disk System (NES). A cartridge version,
                    using battery-backed memory, was released in the United States on August 22, 1987, and Europe on November 27, 1987.
                </p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zelda_II:_The_Adventure_of_Link"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/10/Zelda_II%2C_The_Adventure_of_Link_%28North_Temple%29.png"
                                alt="Zelda under an enchanted sleep"></a>
                </p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">The second game, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zelda_II:_The_Adventure_of_Link"><span class="game-title">Zelda II: The Adventure of Link</span></a>, was released
                    for the Famicom Disk System in Japan in January 14, 1987, and for the Nintendo Entertainment System
                    in Europe in November 1988 and North America in December 1988.
                    The game exchanged the top-down perspective for side-scrolling (though the top-down point of
                    view was retained for overworld areas), and introduced RPG elements (such as experience points)
                    not used previously or thereafter in the series.
                </p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_A_Link_to_the_Past"><img class="img-responsive" src="http://199.101.98.242/media/images/34385-Legend_of_Zelda,_The_-_A_Link_to_the_Past_(USA)-15.jpg"
                                alt="Screenshot of A Link to the Past"></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">Four years later, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_A_Link_to_the_Past"><span class="game-title">The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past</span></a>
                    returned to the top-down view (under a 3/4 perspective), and added the concept of an alternate
                    dimension, the Dark World. The game was released for the Super NES on November 21, 1991.
                    It was later re-released for the Game Boy Advance on March 14, 2003, in North America, on a
                    cartridge with Four Swords,the first multiplayer Zelda, and then through Nintendo's
                    Virtual Console service on January 22, 2007. In addition, both this game (unchanged, except
                    for being converted into a downloadable format) and an exclusive "loosely based" sequel
                    (which used the same game engine) called BS Zelda no Densetsu Inishie no Sekiban were released
                    on the Satellaview in Japan on March 2, 1997, and March 30, 1997, respectively.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Link%27s_Awakening"><img class="img-responsive" src="http://www.zeldadungeon.net/Zelda04/Walkthrough/05/014.png"
                                                                                                                     alt="Link's Awakening screenshot"></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">The next game, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Link%27s_Awakening"><span class="game-title">Link's Awakening</span></a>, is the first Zelda for Nintendo's Game Boy handheld, and the
                    first set outside Hyrule and to exclude Princess Zelda. It was released in 1993, and re-released,
                    in full colour, as a launch title for the Game Boy Color in 1998 as Link's Awakening DX.
                    This re-release features additions such as an extra colour-based dungeon and a photo shop that
                    allows interaction with the Game Boy Printer.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Ocarina_of_Time"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9a/Ocarina3D.jpg"
                                                                                                                  alt="Link swims in the Water Temple while wearing the Zora Tunic, which allows him to breathe underwater."></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">After a five-year hiatus, the series made the transition to 3D with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Ocarina_of_Time"><span class="game-title">Ocarina of Time</span></a> for the
                    Nintendo 64, which was released in November 1998. This game, initially known as Zelda 64,
                    retains the core gameplay of the previous 2D games, and was very successful commercially and
                    critically. It ranks highly on IGN and EGM's "greatest games of all time" lists, and scored
                    perfect scores in several video game publications. In February 2006, it was ranked by
                    Nintendo Power as the best game released for a Nintendo console. The game was originally
                    developed for the poorly selling, Japanese-only Nintendo 64DD, but was ported to cartridge format
                    when the 64DD hardware was delayed.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Majora%27s_Mask"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/60/The_Legend_of_Zelda_-_Majora%27s_Mask_Box_Art.jpg"
                                                                                                                  alt="Majora's Mask box art"></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">Ocarina of Time's follow-up, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Majora%27s_Mask"><span class="game-title">Majora's Mask</span></a>, was released in April 2000. It uses the same 3D game
                    engine as the previous game, and added a time-based concept, in which Link, the protagonist,
                    relives the events of three days as many times as needed to complete the game's objectives.
                    It was originally called Zelda Gaiden, a Japanese title that translates as Zelda Side story.
                    Gameplay changed significantly; in addition to the time-limit, Link can use masks to transform
                    into creatures with unique abilities. While Majora's Mask retains the graphical style of Ocarina
                    of Time, it is also a departure, particularly in its atmosphere. It features motion-blur,
                    unlike its predecessor. The game is darker, dealing with death and tragedy in a manner not
                    previously seen in the series, and has a sense of impending doom, as a large moon slowly descends
                    upon the land of Termina to destroy all life.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Oracle_of_Seasons_and_Oracle_of_Ages"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/02/Oracle-of-seasons-comparison.png"
                                                                                                                                       alt="In Oracle of Seasons, the environment changes with the season.
                                     From top left going clockwise: spring, summer, winter, autumn. Gameplay is sometimes
                                     affected by the seasons; during the winter for example, a path opens up that cannot
                                      be accessed during any other season; or during spring, the flower can be used to
                                      access unreachable ledges."></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">The next two games, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Oracle_of_Seasons_and_Oracle_of_Ages"><span class="game-title">Oracle of Seasons</span></a> and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Oracle_of_Seasons_and_Oracle_of_Ages"><span class="game-title">Oracle of Ages</span></a>, were released simultaneously for the
                    Game Boy Color, and interact using passwords or a Game Link Cable. After one game has
                    been completed, the player is given a password that allows the other game to be played as a sequel.
                    They were developed by Flagship in conjunction with Nintendo, with supervision from Miyamoto.
                    After the team experimented with porting the original The Legend of Zelda to the Game Boy Color,
                    they decided to make an original trilogy to be called the "Triforce Series". When the password
                    system linking the three games proved too troublesome, the concept was reduced to two games at Miyamoto's
                    suggestion. These two games became Oracle of Ages, which is more puzzle-based, and Oracle of Seasons,
                    which is more action-oriented.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_The_Wind_Waker"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a7/The_Wind_Waker_Link_waves_goodbye.png"
                                                                                                                 alt="Wind Waker Link waves goodbye"></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">At Spaceworld 2001, Nintendo showed a cel-shaded Zelda title, later released as
                    <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_The_Wind_Waker"><span class="game-title">The Wind Waker</span></a> in December 2002. Due to poor reception,
                    nothing further was shown until a playable demonstration was ready. Miyamoto felt The Wind Waker
                    would "extend Zelda's reach to all ages". The gameplay centres on controlling wind with a
                    baton called the "Wind Waker" and sailing a small boat around an island-filled ocean, retaining similar
                    gameplay mechanics as the previous 3D games in the series.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Four_Swords_Adventures"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/67/4swordsadvscreen.png"
                                                                                                                         alt="Screenshot depicting the diamond formation during single player play"></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">The next game released in the series was <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Four_Swords_Adventures"><span class="game-title">Four Swords Adventures</span></a>
                    for the GameCube, which was released in early 2004 in Japan and America, and January 2005 in Europe.
                    Based on the handheld Four Swords, Four Swords Adventures was another deviation from previous
                    Zelda gameplay, focusing on level-based and multiplayer gameplay. The game contains 24 levels
                    and a map screen; there is no connecting overworld. For multiplayer features, each player must
                    use a Game Boy Advance system linked to the GameCube via a Nintendo GameCube Game Boy Advance cable.
                    The game features a single-player campaign, in which using a Game Boy Advance is optional.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_The_Minish_Cap"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b8/MinishCap.png"
                                                                                                                 alt="A screenshot of the top-down view used in The Minish Cap"></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">In November 2004 in Japan and Europe, and January 2005 in America, Nintendo released
                    <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_The_Minish_Cap"><span class="game-title">The Minish Cap</span></a> for the Game Boy Advance. In The Minish Cap Link can
                    shrink in size using a mystical, sentient hat named Ezlo. While shrunk, he can see previously
                    explored parts of a dungeon from a different perspective, and enter areas through
                    otherwise-impassable openings</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Twilight_Princess"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/3f/Zelda_-_Twilight_Princess_-_stab.jpg"
                                                                                                                    alt="An arrow points at an enemy whom Link is targeting as he prepares to swing his sword (GameCube version)"></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">In November 2006, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Twilight_Princess"><span class="game-title">Twilight Princess</span></a> was released as the
                    first Zelda game on the Wii, and later, in December 2006, as the last official Nintendo game for the
                    GameCube, the console for which it was originally developed. The game chronicles the struggle of an
                    older Link to clear the troubles of the interacting "Twilight Realm", a mysterious force that appears
                    around Hyrule. When he enters this realm, he is transformed into a wolf, and loses the ability to
                    use his sword, shield or other items, but gains other abilities such as sharpened senses from his
                    new form. Twilight Princess includes an incarnation of Link's horse, Epona, for fast transportation,
                    and features mounted battle scenarios including boss battles that were not seen in previous titles.
                    Twilight Princess diverted from the cel shading of Wind Waker and went for graphics featuring more
                    detailed textures, giving the game a darker atmosphere, thus making it feel more adult than previous
                    games.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Phantom_Hourglass"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/02/Sailing_in_Phantom_Hourglass.jpg"
                                                                                                                    alt="When sailing in Phantom Hourglass, a path can be drawn on the map using the stylus, creating a blue line for the ship to follow."></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">At the 2006 Game Developers Conference, a trailer for <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Phantom_Hourglass"><span class="game-title">Phantom Hourglass</span></a> for the
                    Nintendo DS was shown. It revealed traditional top-down Zelda gameplay optimised for the DS' features,
                    with a cel-shaded 3d graphical style similar to The Wind Waker. At E3 2006, Nintendo confirmed the
                    game's status as a direct sequel to The Wind Waker, and released an extensive playable demo,
                    including a multiplayer mode with "capture the flag" elements.
                    Phantom Hourglass was released on June 23, 2007, in Japan, October 1, 2007,
                    in North America and October 19, 2007, in Europe.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Spirit_Tracks"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/88/Spirit_Tracks_Train_Screenshot.jpg"
                                                                                                                alt="Link operating the Spirit Train along the Spirit Tracks in the overworld."></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">The next Legend of Zelda for the DS, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Spirit_Tracks"><span class="game-title">The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks</span></a>
                    , was released December 7, 2009, in North America and December 11, 2009, in the UK. In this game,
                    the 'spirit tracks', railroads which chain an ancient evil, are disappearing from Hyrule. Zelda and
                    Link go to the 'Spirit Tower' (the ethereal point of convergence for the tracks) to find out why.
                    But villains steal Zelda's body for the resurrection of the Demon King. Rendered disembodied, Zelda
                    is left a spirit, and only Link (and a certain few sages) can see her. Together they go on a quest
                    to restore the spirit tracks, defeat the Demon King, and return Zelda to her body. Using a modified
                    engine of that used in Phantom Hourglass, the notably new feature in this game is that the Phantom
                    Guardians seen in Phantom Hourglass are, through a series of events, periodically controllable.
                    It was the first time in the series that both Link & Zelda work together on the quest.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Skyward_Sword"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/44/LoZ_Skyward_Sword_gameplay.jpg"
                                                                                                                alt="Link flies on his Loftwing bird through the sky. "></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">In April 2008, Miyamoto stated that "the Zelda team is forming again to work on new games".
                    Miyamoto clarified in July that the Zelda team had been working on a new Zelda game for the Wii.
                    In January 2010, Nintendo Executive Satoru Iwata stated that the game would be coming out at some
                    time in 2010, and confirmed that the game would make use of the Wii's MotionPlus feature, which had
                    been announced too late to be integrated into the Twilight Princess Wii release. The game's subtitle
                    was announced at E3 in 2010 as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Skyward_Sword"><span class="game-title">Skyward Sword</span></a>, but its release was
                    delayed to 2011. The game, the earliest in the Legend of Zelda timeline, reveals the origins of
                    Hyrule, Ganon and many elements featured in previous games. It was released on November 20, 2011;
                    the first run included a 25th Anniversary CD of fully orchestrated music from various Zelda games,
                    including Skyward Sword.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_A_Link_Between_Worlds"> <img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/f5/The_legend_of_zelda_a_link_between_worlds_screenshot.jpg"
                                                                                                                         alt="Link's ability to merge onto walls allows the player to enter Lorule and reach previously inaccessible areas."></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well"> Announced in April 2013,
                    <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_A_Link_Between_Worlds">A Link Between Worlds</a>
                    was released in Europe and North America in November 2013. A month later, the game was released in
                    Japan under the title The Legend of Zelda: Triforce of the Gods 2</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Breath_of_the_Wild"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/0/01/BreathoftheWildBoxArt.jpg"
                                                                                                                     alt="The official Wii U box art for The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild."></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-9">
                <p class="well">Nintendo showcased a demo reel at E3 2011, which depicted Link fighting a monster in HD.
                    In January 2013, Nintendo revealed that a new Legend of Zelda game was being planned for the Wii U.
                    The game was officially teased at E3 2014, and was scheduled to be released in 2015.
                    However, in March 2015, the game was delayed to 2016. In April 2016, the game was delayed again
                    to 2017; it was also announced that it would be simultaneously released on the Wii U and NX.
                    At E3 2016, the game was showcased under the official title,
                    <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Breath_of_the_Wild"><span class="game-title">The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.</span></a></p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <div class="row">
            <div class="col-xs-12 col-md-3">
                <p class="well"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Tri_Force_Heroes"><img class="img-responsive" src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/db/The_Legend_of_Zelda_Tri_Force_Heroes_Boxart.jpg"
                                                                                                                   alt="The artwork used for cover packaging for the 2015 action-adventure puzzle game The Legend of Zelda: Tri Force Heroes"></a></p>
            </div>
            <div class="col-xs-9">
                <p class="well">At E3 2015, Nintendo announced <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_Tri_Force_Heroes"><span class="game-title">The Legend of Zelda: Tri Force Heroes</span></a>,
                    a cooperative multiplayer game released for the 3DS in October 2015.</p>
            </div>
        </div>

        <!-- END OF TIMELINE -->

        <h4>Read more about The Legend of Zelda series from its <a href="http://www.zelda.com/">official website</a>
            and from <a href="http://zelda.wikia.com/wiki/Zeldapedia">Zeldapedia</a>.</h4>
        <hr>
        <footer>
            <p>Made by Naiza for <a href="https://www.freecodecamp.com">FreeCodeCamp</a></p>
            <p>Copied a lot of contents from <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Legend_of_Zelda">Wikipedia</a></p>
        </footer>
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