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                ///////////////////////////////// Conditional Operators ////////////////////////////////

// JavaScript's conditional operator can be used as a shorthand for conditional statements(these are covered in a later lesson).

// The conditional operator assigns a value to a variable according to the result of a specified condition.

// The conditional operator has a specified syntax(way of writing/coding) instead of an assigned operator key.

// 1. Conditional : used to test the relationship between a variable's value and another variable's value, using the comparison operators

// Syntax: variablename = (condition) ? value1:value2

// Examples:

let time = 1800; //this is 6pm in military time
let currentSky = time >= 1650 ? "dark" : "light";
time = 700; //this is 7am military time
currentSky = time <= 1650 ? "light" : "dark";

// Q : What is the result of the comparison on line 13 (light or dark)?

///////////////////////////////// Logical Operators ///////////////////////////////////////

// JavaScript's logical operators are used to determine whether an entire statement/condition is true or false depending on the operation and values involved.

// These can be used to assign boolean values to variables or to determine the next course of action in conditional statements.

// The logical operators have symbols known as the operators that are used to perform the operations

// 1. And : if the values on both sides of the operand are true, then the operation returns true. If one is false, the operation returns false. If both are false, the operantion returns false.

// Operator: &&

// Examples:

x = 20;
y = 30;
j = 19;
z = x > 10 && y < 50; // returns true

// 2. Or : if one or more values are true, the entire statement returns true. Only if both sides of the operand are false does the entire statement return true

// Operator: ||

// Examples:

x = 20;
y = 30;
z = x > 10 || y < 15; // returns true because the left side is true, even though the right side is false

// 3. Not : the not operator returns the opposite of the value it is operating on.
// Operator: !
// Examples:
x = false;
y = true;
z = !x; //returns true
z = !y; //returns false

///////////////////////// Exercises /////////////////////////
// 1. Declare a new variable named hours, and set it equal to 12. Use a conditional operator to print "open" if the variable 'hours' is less than or equal to 18, and 'closed' otherwise.

// 2. What does the value of z result to on line 73? Line 74? Line 75?
x = 50;
y = 27;
j = 64;
z = x > 90 && y < 9;
// value?
z = x <= j && y >= 9;
// value?
z = x != j++ && y == 5 * 6;
// value? 

// 3. What does the value of z result to on line 80? Line 81? Line 82?
x = 20;
y = 30;
z = x / 2 <= 10 || y / 2 >= 15;
// value? 
z = x * 5 != 100 || x * 5 == 50;
// value? 
z = x * 5 <= 100 || x * 5 >= 50;
// value? 

// 4. What does the value of z result to on line 87? Line 88? Line 89?
x = false;
y = true;
z = !x || !y;
// value? 
z = !z;
// value? 
z = !z && !x;
// value? 

////////Extra Exercises: 

//1. Write the symbol for the or operator as a comment. 

//2. Write the symbol for the and operator as a comment. 

//3. Create a variable that stores the time that you usually wake up (remember to put this as just a number!)

//4. Create a second variable that stores the time you woke up today. 

//5. Using the conditional operator that we learned on Monday, test whether the second variable is more than or equal to the first variable. If it is, have your code evaluate to "too late" If it is not, have your code evaluate to "on time"

//6. Log your whole conditional operator into the console to check whether you woke up on time or too late!

/* Remember, the conditional operator follows this syntax:
condition ?  value1 : value2. So your condition will be whether the second variable is less than or equal to the first, and your value1 and value2 will be you "too late" and "on time"
*/

//7. Create an array that stores five different numbers. 

//8. Create a new variable in which you write a line of code that tests whether the first number in the array is greater or equal to the second number, AND the fifth number is less than or equal to the third number. (Remember, when calling up data in the array, you just put the name of the variable and the index number in square brackets).

//9. Log the new variable into the console. 

//10. Create a new variable in which you test whether the first number is not equal to the second number, OR whether the second number is equal in data type and value to the fourth number. 

//11. Log the new variable into the console. 
              
            
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Console